NASA Earth Defence Office works, Asteroid 2016 TX68 will pass , no...

NASA Earth Defence Office works, Asteroid 2016 TX68 will pass , no need worry

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Earth Defence Office Astronomers publicised in two weeks, the asteroid measuring 100 feet (2016 TX68) and moving at more than 34,000 mph will make a close pass by Earth.

The scientists stressed that the asteroid has no chance of colliding with earth

Scientists have unveiled that an asteroid known as 2016 TX68, larger than an 18-wheel tractor trailer truck moving at more than 34,000 mph, will make a close pass by earth in two weeks. The asteroid, around 100 feet long, has no chance of hitting earth.

Scientists said that the asteroid may help raise attention towards tracking the thousands of asteroids passing around space that could severely impact, if ever they hit our planet. The asteroid in question is expected to fly as close as 19,245 miles to Earth at 4:06 pm Pacific time on Monday, March 7.

Astronomer Gerald McKeegan at Chabot Space and Science Center in Oakland said that he knows the pass by would be quite close, but there is no risk of any collision and henceforth, no need to worry. It has also been unveiled that the asteroid pass-by would end as far as 10.7 million miles away because researchers have not been able to identify its precise orbit.

The asteroid pass by would not be visible to naked eye. Even if it would then it will be the first time that an asteroid of such a size has come close to earth in three years. The asteroid was discovered three years back and has been traveling as far out as an area between Mars and Jupiter every 780 days.

Scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena said that the chances of hitting earth on its next pass, which is on September 28, 2017, is one in 250-million. It will pass by in 2046 and 2097 as well and then also the chances are quite low.

“The possibilities of collision on any of the three future fly-by dates are far too small to be of any real concern. I fully expect any future observations to reduce the probability even more”, affirmed Paul Chodas, manager of NASA’s Center for Near-Earth Object Studies.

Engadget News reported that, NASA will take your artworks on a spacecraft this year. The exploration agency has launched a new We The Explorers campaign that’s encouraging people to send in a piece of for , the first American mission that’s expected to bring back a small sample of asteroid Bennu for scientists to study on Earth.

“Space exploration is an inherently creative activity,” said Dante Lauretta, principal investigator for OSIRIS-REx at the University of Arizona, in a NASA report. “We are inviting the world to join us on this great adventure by placing their art work on the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft, where it will stay in space for millennia.”

SpaceDaily News report said, NASA is calling all space enthusiasts to send their artistic endeavors on a journey aboard NASA’s Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) spacecraft. This will be the first U.S. mission to collect a sample of an asteroid and return it to Earth for study.
The March fly-by could end up being as far as 10.7 million miles away because researchers are yet to settle on its precise orbit, is also potentially closer to Earth than many of our weather and communications satellites, which orbit at 22,236 miles up in space. The asteroid will not be visible to the naked eye. This asteroid was discovered just three years ago and it takes an egg-shaped lap around the sun.

“The possibilities of collision on any of the three future fly-by dates are far too small to be of any real concern,” said Paul Chodas, manager of NASA’s Center for Near-Earth Object Studies. “I fully expect any future observations to reduce the probability even more.”

“Earth is very much part of a cosmic shooting gallery. You never know on a given day what kind of chunks might intersect the Earth’s atmosphere,” said Andrew Fraknoi, astronomy chairman at Foothill College in Los Altos Hills. “Most of them burn up miles above us. But every once in awhile, they make a splash,” he added.

The Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security, Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) is a planned NASA asteroid study and sample return mission

“The development of the spacecraft and instruments has been a hugely creative process, where ultimately the canvas is the machined metal and composites preparing for launch in September,” said Jason Dworkin, OSIRIS-REx project scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. “It is fitting that this endeavor can inspire the public to express their creativity to be carried by OSIRIS-REx into space.”

According to the MontereyHerald News, this one, known as 2016 TX68, is larger than an 18-wheel tractor trailer truck, and is expected to fly as close as 19,245 miles to Earth at 4:06 p.m. Pacific time on Monday, March 7. For comparison, that’s less than one-tenth as far as the moon is from Earth, or 238,900 miles.

“It’s gonna be close. But it’s going to miss us. There is nothing to worry about,” said Gerald McKeegan, an astronomer at Chabot Space and Science Center in Oakland.

“The possibilities of collision on any of the three future fly-by dates are far too small to be of any real concern,” said Paul Chodas, manager of NASA’s Center for Near-Earth Object Studies. “I fully expect any future observations to reduce the probability even more.”

Source: albanydailystar.com

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