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Anatomy Of A COVID-19 Conspiracy Theory

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Anatomy Of A COVID-19 Conspiracy Theory

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Conspiracy theories need just the right ingredients to take off within a population, and the COVID-19 pandemic has been a breeding ground for them. A Pew Research Center survey recently asked people if they had heard the theory that the COVID-19 outbreak was intentionally planned by people in power. Seventy-one percent of U.S. adults said they had. And a third of those respondents said it was “definitely” or “probably” true.

One version of this theory goes something like this: The COVID-19 pandemic is part of a strategy conceived by global elites such as Bill Gates to roll out vaccinations with tracking chips that would later be activated by 5G, the technology used by cellular networks.

Residents of Palm Beach County, Fla., cited it in a county commissioners hearing in late June when voicing their opposition to mandatory mask enforcement. “Six feet … is military protocol. You’re trying to get people to train them, so when the cameras, the 5G comes out, what? They are going to scan everybody? We’ve got to get scanned? We’ve got to get temperatured? … Are you insane?” asked Cristina Gomez, one of the residents who attended the hearing. She even mentioned Gates by name, asking the commissioners why he is not in jail.

Molly, 24, who lives in Kentucky and asked that her last name not be used, said earlier this spring, her sister told her she did not intend to get the COVID-19 vaccine because she believed it contained microchips. Molly said she was shocked.

“I was like, what are you talking about? That’s not true. And she’s like, ‘Oh well, you know so much about science.’ I’m like, I know that there’s no microchips in vaccines.” She said the conversation spiraled into a fight. “Then I just went upstairs and cried because we are best friends. And now since this, we basically haven’t talked about COVID or what’s going on at all.”

Otis Hart, 42, in New York City sought the help of a tinnitus therapist in May following an ear injury. At the end of his session, Hart shared that he was looking into getting a better Internet connection. “[My therapist] said that things like 5G [are] responsible for some terrible things going on,” Hart said. “And he connected 5G with the coronavirus pandemic.” Hart said he stopped seeing him after this appointment.

NPR talked to more than a dozen people who said they had similar experiences. So how did this particular theory come to be?

The first ingredient of a good conspiracy is a plausible element. Not one that’s necessarily true, just plausible. In this case, the tracking chips. In December, a team of Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers published a paper in the medical journal Science Translational Medicine detailing how something called “quantum dots” could be delivered to the skin to record vaccinations.

Kevin McHugh, now an assistant professor of bioengineering at Rice University and the lead researcher on the project, said he’s baffled by the idea that his project involves tracking chips. “There’s no microchips at all,” he said. “I don’t even know where that comes from. All the quantum dots [do is] produce light.”

The technology, tested on rats, has not yet been tested on humans. McHugh said the dot signals a patient has received a vaccine in an effort to keep an accurate record.

“It is really difficult to determine who has received what vaccines in the developing world because there is not good record keeping,” McHugh said. “So the idea is, can we actually have something that could inform a health care worker what vaccines have been administered and therefore which ones are still needed?”

Funding for the project was provided by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which brings us to the second ingredient of a good conspiracy theory: a real person, someone powerful and rich.

Kate Starbird, an associate professor at the University of Washington, who has studied misinformation during crisis events, said conspiracy theories use the same elements and plug in different actors.

“A rich person controls the world and they want to do bad things so they can continue controlling the world,” she said. “Sometimes it’s George Soros. Now it’s Bill Gates. So, they just move that person over.”

But why Gates this time?

Steven Brill is the founder of NewsGuard, a company that tracks false information. He said there are two reasons: The Gates Foundation funds global vaccination research and drives, and Gates is the co-founder of Microsoft Corp.

“So you have the anti-vaxxer movement targeting Bill Gates as well as the anti-tech movement,” Brill said.

The anti-tech movement brings us to the final ingredient of a good conspiracy theory: an element that makes it go viral. In this case, the fear of 5G and the power of social media.

Joseph Downing, a fellow at the London School of Economics, studied the origins of the 5G conspiracy theory on social media and said he and his colleagues were able to track down the exact account that turned this conspiracy theory into a trending topic on Twitter.

The account was @5gcoronavirus19, which sent out 303 tweets in seven days.

“So you’ve got somebody here who understands a way of, in effect, kind of manipulating the social media landscape,” Downing said.

It’s unclear who operated the @5gcoronavirus19 account, which has since been taken down. But it managed to create such momentum that other platforms picked it up from there. Downing said someone doesn’t need to have a huge following to do that; they just need to know how the algorithm works.

“One thing that we found that was really important was that people were tagging President Trump in their tweets. And that was enough to gain traction,” he said.

Enough traction that more than 70 cellphone towers were set on fire in the United Kingdom in April and May because of their alleged link to the spread of the virus, Mobile UK, which represents Britain’s four mobile operators, told Business Insider in May.

“In the [time of] COVID-19, when we can see [that] a large number of people begin to believe these things and take actions that are harmful to either themselves or their communities then those theories are translated into harm,” Starbird said.

And experts such as Brill and Downing agree: A society so divided because of misinformation can lead to disruptions in elections, health care and even create distrust in the entire democratic system.

Disclosure: The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is a supporter of NPR.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Conspiracy theories need just the right ingredients to take off within a population, and the COVID-19 pandemic has been a breeding ground for them. A Pew Research Center survey in May asked people if they had heard the conspiracy theory that the COVID-19 outbreak was intentionally planned by people in power. Seventy-one percent of U.S. adults said they had, and a third of those respondents said it was probably true. NPR’s Monika Evstatieva reports on how fear, wealth and social media all play a role.

MONIKA EVSTATIEVA, BYLINE: One version of the conspiracy theory goes something like this – COVID-19 is part of a strategy by global elites like Bill Gates to roll out vaccinations around the world that would include tracking chips, and those tracking chips would be activated later by 5G, the technology used by cellular networks.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO)

CHRISTINA GOMEZ: So when the 5G comes out – what? We’ve got to get scanned? We got to get temperatured? Are you insane? What happened to Bill Gates? Why is he not in jail?

EVSTATIEVA: That’s from a widely shared video of a county commissioners meeting in West Palm Beach, Fla. But many others have heard it, too, from their loved ones.

MOLLY: And I was like, you wouldn’t get a vaccine for COVID-19? And she was like, not if there’s going to be microchips in it. And I was like, that’s not true.

EVSTATIEVA: That’s Molly in Kentucky, who asked this not to use her last name. Otis Hart in New York heard it from his therapist.

OTIS HART: He said that things like 5G are responsible for some terrible things going on, and he connected 5G with the coronavirus pandemic.

EVSTATIEVA: So how did this particular conspiracy theory come to be? Let’s break it down. The first ingredient of a good conspiracy is a plausible element, not necessarily true but plausible. In this case, it’s the tracking chips. Last December, a team of MIT researchers published a paper in Science Translational Medicine, a medical journal. It explained how something called quantum dots could be delivered to the skin by a micro needle patches to record vaccinations.

KEVIN MCHUGH: There’s no microchips at all. I don’t even know where that comes from. All that quantum dots are are they produce light.

EVSTATIEVA: That’s Kevin McHugh, the lead researcher of the project, now at Rice University. He says the dots signals that a patient has received the vaccine so that an accurate record is kept.

MCHUGH: It’s really difficult to determine who has received what vaccines in the developing world because there’s not good recordkeeping. So the idea was can we actually have something that could inform a health care worker what vaccines have been administered and therefore which ones are still needed?

EVSTATIEVA: The technology, tested on rats, has not yet been used with humans. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation funded the project, which brings us to the second ingredient of a good conspiracy theory – a real person, someone who is powerful and rich.

KATE STARBIRD: OK. A rich person controls the world, and they want to do bad things so they can continue controlling the world. Sometimes it’s George Soros. Now it’s Bill Gates.

EVSTATIEVA: That’s Kate Starbird, an associate professor at the University of Washington. She has studied misinformation during crisis events.

STARBIRD: For some of these conspiracy theories now, there are multiple pieces that we’ve seen before. So they’ve just, like, moved that person over.

EVSTATIEVA: But why Bill Gates this time? Steve Brill is the founder of NewsGuard, a company that tracks false information. He says, on one hand, the Gates Foundation has funded global vaccination research and drives for years. But also Gates is the co-founder of Microsoft.

STEVEN BRILL: So you have the anti-vaxxer movement targeting Bill Gates as well as the anti-tech movement.

EVSTATIEVA: There anti-tech movement brings us to the final ingredient of a good conspiracy theory – an element that makes it go viral – in this case, the fear of 5G and the power of social media. Joseph Downing, at the London School of Economics, tracked down the exact account that turned the 5G element of the theory into a trending topic on Twitter.

JOSEPH DOWNING: So we’ve got it here, the @5gcoronavirus19, which sent out 303 tweets in seven days. So you’ve got somebody here who understands a way of manipulating the social media landscape.

EVSTATIEVA: The account was taken out, but it managed to create such momentum that other platforms picked it up from there. Downing says for someone to be able to do that, they don’t need to have a huge following. They just need to know how the algorithm works.

DOWNING: One thing that we found that was really important was rather that people were tagging President Trump in their tweets, and that was enough to gain traction for the conspiracy theories.

EVSTATIEVA: Enough traction that over 70 cellphone towers have been set on fire in the U.K. because of their alleged link to the spread of the virus. Here’s Starbird again.

STARBIRD: In the COVID-19 one, we can see when a large number of people begin to believe these things and take actions that are harmful to either themselves or their communities. Then those theories are translated into harm.

EVSTATIEVA: Experts like Brill and Downing agree – a society so divided because of misinformation can lead to disruptions in elections, in health care and even create distrust in the entire democratic system. Monika Evstatieva, NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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Sanders and Schumer call on McConnell to hold hearings to fight election conspiracy theories – KTVZ

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Sanders and Schumer call on McConnell to hold hearings to fight election conspiracy theories - KTVZ

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Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer of New York are calling on Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to create a new bipartisan committee focused on election integrity and schedule hearings to reassure Americans over a process President Donald Trump has repeatedly sought to undermine.

There is growing anxiety among Democrats, and some Republicans, that Trump will not only continue to sow doubt over the legitimacy of the coming election but throw the subsequent count into chaos by declaring victory before all the votes can be tallied, including the millions that will arrive by mail.

In a letter to McConnell, Sanders and Schumer quote back the Kentucky senator’s own words, in which he attested to the reliability of mail-in voting by citing its successes in Oregon, Washington and Colorado, which have been using the system for years.

Trump has repeatedly questioned the validity of mail-in voting, promoted conspiracy theories questioning election security, called on supporters to act as unsanctioned “poll watchers,” and suggested that the absence of a clear result by the evening of November 3 would in some way cast doubt on the eventual outcome. Key allies in powerful positions, like Attorney General Bill Barr, have followed suit. Barr has persisted in puffing up a debunked claim that ballots received by mail would somehow strip the sender of their privacy — ignoring well-established safeguards.

By escalating the matter now, Sanders and Schumer are responding to growing concern, in partisan and nonpartisan spaces, that Americans are not adequately prepared for the potential of a longer-than-usual wait for results or Trump’s willingness to short-circuit the democratic process if he smells defeat.

“Democrats and Republicans in Congress must come together to ensure that we have a free and fair election where every vote is cast and counted without intimidation,” Sanders told CNN, “where no one has to put his or her health in danger to cast a ballot, and where we have full confidence in the results.”

The proposed hearings would invite a cross-section of election officials from across the country to testify to the security and reliability of mail-in, early- and in-person voting — subjects on which Sanders and Schumer, again, referenced McConnell’s own words.

“Despite the clear security of our vote-by-mail system, some have continued to undermine it with unsubstantiated claims of voter fraud,” they wrote. “As you have correctly said, people ‘can vote early, you can vote on Election Day, or you can drop it in the mail,’ and that voters should ‘not worry about your vote not counting.’”

The minority leader and Sanders, an independent who caucuses with the Democrats, also want more detailed discussion about the fraught hours, or days, after the polls close and a real-time watch of the election horse race potentially swings from one candidate to another.

“We know a number of states may well be counting ballots for a period of time after Election Day, and that those votes may be determinative in this election,” the senators wrote to McConnell. “To avoid disinformation, conspiracy theories, and suspicion about results, we must understand the likely timeline for this process.”

The letter goes on to reference the recent war games-style preparations conducted by a group called the Transition Integrity Project, a bipartisan gathering of operatives and academics that made headlines when some of the outcomes of their exercises — including “both street-level violence and political impasse” — were reported on in late July.

“A bipartisan group of experts and officials have studied multiple scenarios where the outcome of the election was not immediately known. Some of these scenarios resulted in unrest and even violence,” Sanders and Schumer wrote, suggesting the Senate should elevate similar discussions and familiarize the public with the uncertainties ahead. “We would like to hear from the most knowledgeable people in the country as to how we can do everything possible to make sure that the election and the period afterward is secure and peaceful.”

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HHS official sorry for conspiracy theory video

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HHS official sorry for conspiracy theory video

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HHS supported Caputo, with a statement that called him a critical, integral part of the presidents coronavirus response, leading on public messaging as Americans need public health information to defeat the COVID-19 pandemic.

There was no immediate statement from the White House.

Attempts to reach Caputo were unsuccessful.

On Capitol Hill, Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., called on Azar to fire Caputo, accusing the spokesman of trying to interfere with CDC reports to the medical and scientific community, as well as the public at large. And Senate Minority leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., called on Azar himself to resign, citing interference with the CDC as one example of what he termed the administration’s failures.

Officials at CDC have privately complained of recent efforts by political appointees at main HHS to try to edit or press for changes in the agency’s weekly MMWR publications, a go-to resource for public health professionals.

MMWR articles are technical, but they reveal telling details. One published earlier this year noted that while Trump’s travel restrictions dramatically reduced travel from China in February, nothing was being done at that time to restrict travel from Italy and Europe, where the coronavirus was spreading widely and rapidly. Analysis of virus samples from hard-hit New York in March suggested it was introduced there from Europe and other parts of the U.S., the CDC article reported.

Caputo is an unswerving Trump loyalist. His recent book, The Ukraine Hoax, claims the presidents phony impeachment was rooted in a vast conspiracy.

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unwinona:This is exactly what conspiracy theorists and anti-vaxxers have done with their HIV/AIDS…

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unwinona:This is exactly what conspiracy theorists and anti-vaxxers have done with their HIV/AIDS...

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My RSS Feedunwinona:

This is exactly what conspiracy theorists and anti-vaxxers have done with their HIV/AIDS and Polio narrative (among others), only we’re seeing it escalated to weeks and months instead of years or decades.

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