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How the celebrity chef turned wellness guru is making a FORTUNE by sharing dangerous conspiracy theories along with his recipes

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How the celebrity chef turned wellness guru is making a FORTUNE by sharing dangerous conspiracy theories along with his recipes

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Celebrity chef Pete Evans stands to rake in hundreds of thousands of dollars a year by spreading dangerous conspiracy theories.

Since being dumped from his $800,000 Channel 7 contract to host My Kitchen Rules, he has pivoted to being a wellness guru on social media.

And while Evans has always promoted controversial remedies, he has branched out into coronavirus conspiracies during the pandemic.

He now shares dozens of posts, memes, and videos a week on social media denying the deadly virus’s severity while hawking phony ‘health’ products.

But at the same time as downplaying the dangers Evans has targeted his 1.75million social media followers with sponsored posts for an ineffective $15,000 BioCharger lamp and essential oils that claim to combat coronavirus.

There it is! Conspiracy theorist Pete Evans has doubled down on his use of the ineffective BioCharger, sharing a photo to Instagram on Thursday of himself using the $15,000 lamp

There it is! Conspiracy theorist Pete Evans has doubled down on his use of the ineffective BioCharger, sharing a photo to Instagram on Thursday of himself using the $15,000 lamp

He shares dozens of posts, memes, and videos a week on social media denying the deadly virus' severity while hocking phony 'health' products. But at the same time, his sponsored posts to 1.75 million social media followers include a $15,000 lamp, and essential oils (pictured) that claim to combat coronavirus

He shares dozens of posts, memes, and videos a week on social media denying the deadly virus’ severity while hocking phony ‘health’ products. But at the same time, his sponsored posts to 1.75 million social media followers include a $15,000 lamp, and essential oils (pictured) that claim to combat coronavirus

Celebrity agent Max Markson said Evans’ enormous reach to an enthusiastic and impressionable customer base was extremely lucrative. 

‘There’s a massive market for conspiracy theories and serious money, even if only one per cent of people believe them,’ he told Daily Mail Australia.

‘Pete Evans is also genuine, he believes it, so there’s an authenticity that adds to his credibility in this market.

‘Only a small number of people will follow him, but they will be loyal and engaged. He’s got a market and he will be making money from it.’

Markson said controversial essential oils company doTERRA, which Evans frequently promotes, was a market that many people trusted.

‘There’s a big community that believes in essentials oils and spends money on them, and coronavirus has caused a huge surge in interest,’ he said.

‘People are earning more than $2,000 a month direct selling them to their contacts so Evans could be earning much more promoting it.’

In use: He also claimed that his family used the 'non-invasive' lamp 'pretty much every day'

In use: He also claimed that his family used the ‘non-invasive’ lamp ‘pretty much every day’

Conspiracy theorist and celebrity chef Pete Evans doubles down on his use of controversial $15,000 BioCharger lamp - after copping a whopping fine for $25,200 after he promoted it

Conspiracy theorist and celebrity chef Pete Evans doubles down on his use of controversial $15,000 BioCharger lamp – after copping a whopping fine for $25,200 after he promoted it

Multilevel marketing company doTERRA has come under fire for claiming its essential oils can help fight coronavirus, but Evans has made numerous sponsored posts for it.

Markson said an influencer with Evans’ following could easily make $250,000 a year from sponsored posts alone – $5,000 each, and a celebrity with loyal fans like Evans could earn even more with a cut of the sales.

‘Don’t cry for Pete Evans losing MKR, he’s got a big following of people who like him, admire him, and respect him, and conspiracy theory people believe in him,’ he said.

‘It’s an implied endorsement if he plugs something.’ 

Evans’ influx of new conspiracy theorist followers would also increase sales of his cookbooks and other projects.

He will soon open the Evolve Health Labs ‘healing clinic’ in notorious anti-vaxxer haven Byron Bay and is a key investor in the Nightcap on Minjungbal hippie commune nearby.

Nightcap on Minjungbal (site pictured) is being developed at Mount Burrell near Nimbin

Nightcap on Minjungbal (site pictured) is being developed at Mount Burrell near Nimbin

The website says: 'We are very open

The website says: ‘We are very open “alternative” style dwellings such as Earth-ships, Shipping Container Homes and so forth’. Pictured is an example of a cabin built by a designer who is working on the project

‘When he opens that health clinic, his fans will go there. At least the food will be great,’ Markson said. 

Among the sponsored content was the $15,000 BioCharger lamp, which he promoted as a potential coronavirus cure. 

Evans was slapped with a $25,200 infringement notice by the Therapeutic Goods Administration for making false claims.

According to the product’s website, ‘the BioCharger NG is a hybrid subtle energy revitalization platform.

‘The transmitted energy stimulates and invigorates the entire body to optimize and improve potential health, wellness, and athletic performance.’

There is no evidence to support this. The BioCharger is just an expensive lamp.

Inside Pete's strange world: The new venture, located in the Habitat Lifestyle Precinct on Bayshore Drive, has welcomed some new additions since renovations began in May

Inside Pete’s strange world: The new venture, located in the Habitat Lifestyle Precinct on Bayshore Drive, has welcomed some new additions since renovations began in May

New addition: A large cryotherapy booth, otherwise known as an 'arctic chamber', has been installed inside the clinic in recent weeks
Pseudoscience: There is no scientific evidence that cryotherapy has any benefits

New addition: A large cryotherapy booth, otherwise known as an ‘arctic chamber’, has been installed inside the clinic in recent weeks

Earlier this month Evans promoted controversial essential oils company doTERRA, which has also come under fire for claiming it can help combat coronavirus.    

Social psychology Mathew Marques, from La Trobe University, told The New Daily these types of posts, where celebrities sell unfounded treatments or devices, were just profiting off the pandemic.

The celebrity chef, who has a number of top selling cookbooks, has come under fire for his controversial posts. 

Evans has been widely criticised for falsely referring to the coronavirus crisis as a ‘plandemic’ orchestrated by government officials. 

But that hasn’t stopped him. 

Evans listed his Malabar mansion for sale earlier this month as he makes his next move to Australia’s hippie capital, Byron Bay, where he is set to open a ‘healing clinic’.

According to the company’s Instagram account, the clinic will offer ‘transformational practices’ such as ‘cold and conscious breath-work’ and ‘cryotherapy’.

Evans and his wife, Kiwi glamour model Nicola Robinson, 42, will auction off the five-bedroom property next month, with a buying guide of $3.2million

Evans and his wife, Kiwi glamour model Nicola Robinson, 42, will auction off the five-bedroom property next month, with a buying guide of $3.2million

Covidiot: Pete (right) was fined $25,200 in April for promoting the lamp which he claimed could help treat coronavirus

Covidiot: Pete (right) was fined $25,200 in April for promoting the lamp which he claimed could help treat coronavirus

Help me! In a desperate call to action on Saturday, Evans told his Facebook followers to share his posts with their friends because people aren't seeing his content organically

Help me! In a desperate call to action on Saturday, Evans told his Facebook followers to share his posts with their friends because people aren’t seeing his content organically

Evans owns a farm just a short drive from Byron Bay, and has been self-isolating on the property with his family for much of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Earlier this month Evans claimed people who wore face masks to stop the spread of the virus were ‘weak’.

The former My Kitchen Rules judge made the dangerous claims in a 40-minute Facebook video.

In the footage, which is no longer available online, Evans wore a red MAGA hat and cited a American Doctor Ben Tapper, who likened eating junk food to putting metaphorical boulders in a backpack.

‘[People who] put a mask on, that is another f***ing boulder in your backpack. It is another sign of weakness, suppression, muzzling,’ he said, according to The Daily Telegraph.

In July, he claimed that COVID-19 was a ‘f**king hoax’ and that the pandemic ‘doesn’t compare to what is happening in the world on a large scale’.

He has also encouraged people to ignore government safety measures, such as the order to wear masks in public in Victoria, and to challenge fines through the courts.

Among his false claims about the pandemic, Evans has previously declared he’s immune to coronavirus, and blamed the health crisis on 5G technology.

He also endorsed fellow conspiracy theorist David Icke, a Holocaust denier who was denied entry to Australia last year after protests from the Jewish community.

It is not suggested that Evans endorses the views of Icke relating specifically to Holocaust denial or the Jewish people. He instead supports Icke’s views on globalist conspiracy theories and media manipulation.

In recent years, Evans, an author of more than 25 books, has garnered criticism over his views on diets and medicine.   

In 2017, he produced a paleo documentary film on Netflix, The Magic Pill, which claimed people suffering from illnesses like cancer, diabetes and autism can reduce their symptoms and cut down on prescription medicine by changing their diet for five weeks.

Last year, doctors publicly called on the cook to stop sharing his own health advice after he released an anti-vaxx podcast. 

Evans’ central belief is that ‘food is medicine’ and that by following a Paleo diet, people can develop superhuman immune systems that can withstand all illnesses, including COVID-19.

There is absolutely no scientific basis for this. Following a particular diet does not make a person any less likely to contract the deadly respiratory virus.

Leaving his mark: Pete also made sure to include unique features that one might expect from a controversial 'wellness guru'. These include an infrared sauna, tea room, heated magnesium swimming pool, ozone spa, fluoride-free water facilities, and solar panels

Leaving his mark: Pete also made sure to include unique features that one might expect from a controversial ‘wellness guru’. These include an infrared sauna, tea room, heated magnesium swimming pool, ozone spa, fluoride-free water facilities, and solar panels

Inside the amazing modern hippy commune promoted by Pete Evans

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Sanders and Schumer call on McConnell to hold hearings to fight election conspiracy theories – KTVZ

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Sanders and Schumer call on McConnell to hold hearings to fight election conspiracy theories - KTVZ

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Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer of New York are calling on Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to create a new bipartisan committee focused on election integrity and schedule hearings to reassure Americans over a process President Donald Trump has repeatedly sought to undermine.

There is growing anxiety among Democrats, and some Republicans, that Trump will not only continue to sow doubt over the legitimacy of the coming election but throw the subsequent count into chaos by declaring victory before all the votes can be tallied, including the millions that will arrive by mail.

In a letter to McConnell, Sanders and Schumer quote back the Kentucky senator’s own words, in which he attested to the reliability of mail-in voting by citing its successes in Oregon, Washington and Colorado, which have been using the system for years.

Trump has repeatedly questioned the validity of mail-in voting, promoted conspiracy theories questioning election security, called on supporters to act as unsanctioned “poll watchers,” and suggested that the absence of a clear result by the evening of November 3 would in some way cast doubt on the eventual outcome. Key allies in powerful positions, like Attorney General Bill Barr, have followed suit. Barr has persisted in puffing up a debunked claim that ballots received by mail would somehow strip the sender of their privacy — ignoring well-established safeguards.

By escalating the matter now, Sanders and Schumer are responding to growing concern, in partisan and nonpartisan spaces, that Americans are not adequately prepared for the potential of a longer-than-usual wait for results or Trump’s willingness to short-circuit the democratic process if he smells defeat.

“Democrats and Republicans in Congress must come together to ensure that we have a free and fair election where every vote is cast and counted without intimidation,” Sanders told CNN, “where no one has to put his or her health in danger to cast a ballot, and where we have full confidence in the results.”

The proposed hearings would invite a cross-section of election officials from across the country to testify to the security and reliability of mail-in, early- and in-person voting — subjects on which Sanders and Schumer, again, referenced McConnell’s own words.

“Despite the clear security of our vote-by-mail system, some have continued to undermine it with unsubstantiated claims of voter fraud,” they wrote. “As you have correctly said, people ‘can vote early, you can vote on Election Day, or you can drop it in the mail,’ and that voters should ‘not worry about your vote not counting.’”

The minority leader and Sanders, an independent who caucuses with the Democrats, also want more detailed discussion about the fraught hours, or days, after the polls close and a real-time watch of the election horse race potentially swings from one candidate to another.

“We know a number of states may well be counting ballots for a period of time after Election Day, and that those votes may be determinative in this election,” the senators wrote to McConnell. “To avoid disinformation, conspiracy theories, and suspicion about results, we must understand the likely timeline for this process.”

The letter goes on to reference the recent war games-style preparations conducted by a group called the Transition Integrity Project, a bipartisan gathering of operatives and academics that made headlines when some of the outcomes of their exercises — including “both street-level violence and political impasse” — were reported on in late July.

“A bipartisan group of experts and officials have studied multiple scenarios where the outcome of the election was not immediately known. Some of these scenarios resulted in unrest and even violence,” Sanders and Schumer wrote, suggesting the Senate should elevate similar discussions and familiarize the public with the uncertainties ahead. “We would like to hear from the most knowledgeable people in the country as to how we can do everything possible to make sure that the election and the period afterward is secure and peaceful.”

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HHS official sorry for conspiracy theory video

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HHS official sorry for conspiracy theory video

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HHS supported Caputo, with a statement that called him a critical, integral part of the presidents coronavirus response, leading on public messaging as Americans need public health information to defeat the COVID-19 pandemic.

There was no immediate statement from the White House.

Attempts to reach Caputo were unsuccessful.

On Capitol Hill, Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., called on Azar to fire Caputo, accusing the spokesman of trying to interfere with CDC reports to the medical and scientific community, as well as the public at large. And Senate Minority leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., called on Azar himself to resign, citing interference with the CDC as one example of what he termed the administration’s failures.

Officials at CDC have privately complained of recent efforts by political appointees at main HHS to try to edit or press for changes in the agency’s weekly MMWR publications, a go-to resource for public health professionals.

MMWR articles are technical, but they reveal telling details. One published earlier this year noted that while Trump’s travel restrictions dramatically reduced travel from China in February, nothing was being done at that time to restrict travel from Italy and Europe, where the coronavirus was spreading widely and rapidly. Analysis of virus samples from hard-hit New York in March suggested it was introduced there from Europe and other parts of the U.S., the CDC article reported.

Caputo is an unswerving Trump loyalist. His recent book, The Ukraine Hoax, claims the presidents phony impeachment was rooted in a vast conspiracy.

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unwinona:This is exactly what conspiracy theorists and anti-vaxxers have done with their HIV/AIDS…

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unwinona:This is exactly what conspiracy theorists and anti-vaxxers have done with their HIV/AIDS...

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My RSS Feedunwinona:

This is exactly what conspiracy theorists and anti-vaxxers have done with their HIV/AIDS and Polio narrative (among others), only we’re seeing it escalated to weeks and months instead of years or decades.

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