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Sinclair yanked a pandemic conspiracy theory program. But it has stayed in line with Trump on coronavirus.

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Sinclair yanked a pandemic conspiracy theory program. But it has stayed in line with Trump on coronavirus.

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When she interviewed Trump himself a week later, he told her that hed seen tremendous reports and incredible studies about its effectiveness. Attkisson didnt ask for details nor raise any questions about the fatal heart arrhythmias that have been associated with its use.

Whatever the underlying merits, Attkissons report and interview were consistent with much of the commentary about the pandemic emanating from her employer, the Sinclair Broadcast Group. In its national opinion programs, Sinclair the owner of 191 TV stations, one of the largest groups in the country has stayed largely faithful to Trumps pronouncements about the virus.

Sinclair and Bolling initially defended the segment, which briefly streamed on some of its stations websites. It featured an interview with Judy Mikovits, star of a debunked video called The Plandemic that was banned by Facebook and YouTube for spreading misinformation. Did Dr. Fauci create Covid-19? read an on-screen graphic.

Sinclair, based in the Baltimore suburb of Hunt Valley, has repeatedly defended the independence and objectivity of the local news reporting that is carried on its many stations. But its nationally distributed news and commentary programs, produced in Washington, have periodically been embroiled in controversy for their perceived Trump-friendly bias.

Following the 2016 presidential campaign, Trumps son-in-law, Jared Kushner, boasted about an agreement with Sinclair that gave the companys stations special access. (Sinclair said it offered the same terms to Hillary Clintons campaign but was rejected.) In 2017, the company hired former Trump aide Boris Epshteyn as its national political commentator; he has since returned to the Trump campaign.

Several of Sinclairs hosts and reporters, such as Bolling and journalist James Rosen, were former stars at Fox News. Sinclair also carries a program hosted by former Fox News host Bill OReilly on its streaming platform, Stirr.

Sinclair attracted unwelcome attention early last year when an eerie compilation video of its many news anchors from across the country reading the same promotional script went viral. Sinclair said it was merely highlighting its commitment to accurate reporting; critics said its reference to fake news was an effort to boost Trumps attacks on the news media.

The pattern has suggested that the company, controlled by the heirs of founder Julian Sinclair Smith, has harnessed its station group as a political vehicle. Their purpose seems to be to [promote] Donald Trump and far-right opinion, said Lewis Friedland, a journalism professor at the University of Wisconsin.

In a statement, Sinclairs representatives drew a distinction between its local newscasts and the opinion programming it produces.

It is important to note that [Bollings show] America This Week is a political talk show that aims to bring together a diverse set of viewpoints and that the views of the guests and the host are their own, and not Sinclairs, said Michael Padovano, a company spokesman. We are always looking for interesting topics and guests, and some guests come with views that are not popular. As it relates to the segment featuring Dr. Mikovits we reviewed it further and determined it to be inappropriate to air.

In a text exchange this week, Attkisson also defended her work. As I reported, there are two divergent views of [hydroxychloroquine] that have tended to fall along political lines, and the jury is still out, she wrote. This is in contrast to widespread reports that stated or implied the scientific case on hydroxychloroquine as a potential treatment or preventive measure had been closed, even as multiple studies on it including by the government were actively underway.

She added: Ironically, powerful interests are able to successfully direct media attention so that the scrutiny falls on the accurate reporting rather than the many false and misleading reports. … The idea that certain interests are working so hard to censor this information should be a red flag that leads all of us to ask why.

As it turns out, Sinclairs chief executive, Christopher Ripley, is a hydroxychloroquine enthusiast, who championed the drug in an April email to Sinclair employees.

On the good news front, there is a growing medical consensus (lack of large-scale tests aside) that hydroxychloroquine plus zinc and azithromycin is an effective treatment for the virus and is believed to materially impact patient outcomes, Ripley wrote. These drugs have been around and widely used for decades so their side effects are minimal and well know[n], and production can be scaled quickly. It is my hope that every hospital in the country will make this a standard protocol and dramatically reduce the deaths that may occur in the weeks to come.

Bolling who landed an interview with Trump in early July has echoed the presidents urgency to reopen the economy during the pandemic and has amplified Trumps concerns about the potential for fraud with mail-in balloting, despite scant evidence of it.

During an interview in July with Sam Reed, a former Republican secretary of state in Washington state, Bolling asked, Tell us about the fraud that could happen. He later asked, So do you not see the opportunity for fraud with mail-in voting? Reed replied that voting by mail is a very good system, if the state prepares for it. We havent really had any problems.

In a tweet in May, Bolling alluded to another conspiracy theory: that billionaire philanthropist George Soros has helped organize protests in the wake of George Floyds death. He called George Soros the OG a slang term meaning original gangster of organizing and financing riots, looting and civil unrest an unfounded statement with anti-Semitic overtones. Soros, who is Jewish, has been accused without evidence by authoritarian governments around the world with fomenting unrest.

According to tracking by Media Matters, the liberal watchdog group, Bolling has repeatedly raised the discredited notion that the coronavirus was engineered by Chinese scientists as a biological weapon. In late April, he interviewed former Trump adviser Stephen K. Bannon, who offered just such a conspiratorial view without challenge from Bolling. During the same program, Rep. Michael McCaul (R-Tex.), told Bolling he was concerned about the bioweapons claim, based on classified briefings.

Bolling initially agreed to an interview for this story, but then declined.

In addition to Trump himself, top administration officials and Trump supporters have been regular guests on Bollings program over the past two months. The guest list includes Vice President Pence, senior adviser Kellyanne Conway, acting deputy secretary of Homeland Security Ken Cuccinelli and White House officials Peter Navarro and JaRon Smith. Others include Trump campaign spokesman Hogan Gidley, Trump lawyer Rudolph W. Giuliani and Trump loyalists Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) and Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.). Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson has appeared twice.

Sinclair countered that Bolling interviewed several Democratic primary candidates in the early months of the campaign.

For some of those whove worked for Sinclair, the conservative slant is familiar. Station news managers were used to receiving must-run directives from headquarters for Epshteyns commentaries; they say they still receive daily news reports that favor Trumps position or attack his critics.

Sinclair has always wanted to be Fox News-plus, said Israel Balderas, a former anchor and reporter for a Sinclair-owned station in Florida and a former segment producer at Fox News. Well, if it walks like a duck and talks like a duck …

Balderas, now a journalism professor, added, Time and time again, [their] message seems to be, Trump isnt responsible [for the response to the pandemic] and hes not to blame. Theyre in the business of making excuses for him.



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Sanders and Schumer call on McConnell to hold hearings to fight election conspiracy theories – KTVZ

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Sanders and Schumer call on McConnell to hold hearings to fight election conspiracy theories - KTVZ

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Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer of New York are calling on Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to create a new bipartisan committee focused on election integrity and schedule hearings to reassure Americans over a process President Donald Trump has repeatedly sought to undermine.

There is growing anxiety among Democrats, and some Republicans, that Trump will not only continue to sow doubt over the legitimacy of the coming election but throw the subsequent count into chaos by declaring victory before all the votes can be tallied, including the millions that will arrive by mail.

In a letter to McConnell, Sanders and Schumer quote back the Kentucky senator’s own words, in which he attested to the reliability of mail-in voting by citing its successes in Oregon, Washington and Colorado, which have been using the system for years.

Trump has repeatedly questioned the validity of mail-in voting, promoted conspiracy theories questioning election security, called on supporters to act as unsanctioned “poll watchers,” and suggested that the absence of a clear result by the evening of November 3 would in some way cast doubt on the eventual outcome. Key allies in powerful positions, like Attorney General Bill Barr, have followed suit. Barr has persisted in puffing up a debunked claim that ballots received by mail would somehow strip the sender of their privacy — ignoring well-established safeguards.

By escalating the matter now, Sanders and Schumer are responding to growing concern, in partisan and nonpartisan spaces, that Americans are not adequately prepared for the potential of a longer-than-usual wait for results or Trump’s willingness to short-circuit the democratic process if he smells defeat.

“Democrats and Republicans in Congress must come together to ensure that we have a free and fair election where every vote is cast and counted without intimidation,” Sanders told CNN, “where no one has to put his or her health in danger to cast a ballot, and where we have full confidence in the results.”

The proposed hearings would invite a cross-section of election officials from across the country to testify to the security and reliability of mail-in, early- and in-person voting — subjects on which Sanders and Schumer, again, referenced McConnell’s own words.

“Despite the clear security of our vote-by-mail system, some have continued to undermine it with unsubstantiated claims of voter fraud,” they wrote. “As you have correctly said, people ‘can vote early, you can vote on Election Day, or you can drop it in the mail,’ and that voters should ‘not worry about your vote not counting.’”

The minority leader and Sanders, an independent who caucuses with the Democrats, also want more detailed discussion about the fraught hours, or days, after the polls close and a real-time watch of the election horse race potentially swings from one candidate to another.

“We know a number of states may well be counting ballots for a period of time after Election Day, and that those votes may be determinative in this election,” the senators wrote to McConnell. “To avoid disinformation, conspiracy theories, and suspicion about results, we must understand the likely timeline for this process.”

The letter goes on to reference the recent war games-style preparations conducted by a group called the Transition Integrity Project, a bipartisan gathering of operatives and academics that made headlines when some of the outcomes of their exercises — including “both street-level violence and political impasse” — were reported on in late July.

“A bipartisan group of experts and officials have studied multiple scenarios where the outcome of the election was not immediately known. Some of these scenarios resulted in unrest and even violence,” Sanders and Schumer wrote, suggesting the Senate should elevate similar discussions and familiarize the public with the uncertainties ahead. “We would like to hear from the most knowledgeable people in the country as to how we can do everything possible to make sure that the election and the period afterward is secure and peaceful.”

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HHS official sorry for conspiracy theory video

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HHS official sorry for conspiracy theory video

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HHS supported Caputo, with a statement that called him a critical, integral part of the presidents coronavirus response, leading on public messaging as Americans need public health information to defeat the COVID-19 pandemic.

There was no immediate statement from the White House.

Attempts to reach Caputo were unsuccessful.

On Capitol Hill, Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., called on Azar to fire Caputo, accusing the spokesman of trying to interfere with CDC reports to the medical and scientific community, as well as the public at large. And Senate Minority leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., called on Azar himself to resign, citing interference with the CDC as one example of what he termed the administration’s failures.

Officials at CDC have privately complained of recent efforts by political appointees at main HHS to try to edit or press for changes in the agency’s weekly MMWR publications, a go-to resource for public health professionals.

MMWR articles are technical, but they reveal telling details. One published earlier this year noted that while Trump’s travel restrictions dramatically reduced travel from China in February, nothing was being done at that time to restrict travel from Italy and Europe, where the coronavirus was spreading widely and rapidly. Analysis of virus samples from hard-hit New York in March suggested it was introduced there from Europe and other parts of the U.S., the CDC article reported.

Caputo is an unswerving Trump loyalist. His recent book, The Ukraine Hoax, claims the presidents phony impeachment was rooted in a vast conspiracy.

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unwinona:This is exactly what conspiracy theorists and anti-vaxxers have done with their HIV/AIDS…

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unwinona:This is exactly what conspiracy theorists and anti-vaxxers have done with their HIV/AIDS...

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My RSS Feedunwinona:

This is exactly what conspiracy theorists and anti-vaxxers have done with their HIV/AIDS and Polio narrative (among others), only we’re seeing it escalated to weeks and months instead of years or decades.

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